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I'm a 30-something dad trying to bridge the gap between Ina Garten and Roseanne. I live in Florida with my husband, daughter, and Kitchenaid mixer.

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March 28, 2008

Comments

matt

Well I think it's important to remember that eating offal and organ meat was never meant to be exclusive or seen as wealthy; it was something people did to utilize every single piece of the animal.

I still find it funny that someone with a food attitude (including many snobs and rich folk) could eat foie gras on a nice expensive platter yet scoff at a taco truck serving Barbacoa.

Oh, some people!

Ex-Restaurant Manager

Fois gras makes me gag. Give me a char-grilled steak with a melting pat of herb butter on top. Now that's food.

Blobby

UGH. Danke Nein.

atomic

I think of this phenomenon as one of several "class inversions." For example: It used to be the case that pale skin was a sign of class, because only the wealthy could avoid outdoor manual labor. Now, in industrialized nations, being tan is better, because it means you now have the free time to go out and exercise for recreation. Similarly, being fat was (and in some countries, still is) considered a sign of wealth because you could afford to overeat--now, thin is in because you can afford NOT to. Rich people eat weird foods not for nutrition, but for aesthetics. It has nothing to do with taste or sustenance, and everything to do with cachet and status, just like everything else the rich do.

So let them eat (octopus) cake. I'll have the porterhouse, thank you very much.

Chris

I agree... just because you CAN eat it, doesn't mean you should. I tried Sea Cucumber once... why would you want to put baby poop in your mouth, yuck, but foo-foo foodies were all over it because it was made by Super Pubah Chef Snotty McFukwad.
pate de foie gras is actually "outlawed" in Chicago now and I think it's funny. You'd think they had taken away the right to free speech.

Christie

I think there are two motivations for seeking out different foods such as fois gras. One is to understand and the other is to consume. Usually the latter is the more common motivation as you brought up in your blog.
When I was a foreigner, I found myself the guest of a very generous host on many occasions.(yeah, the blond hair helped)
They never allowed you to order, but ordered for you because they were so proud of their culture and food is a very direct immediate way of understanding people on a basic common level. For this reason, it shouldn't depend on price or local. Indeed that taco stand or gyro can be just as exciting and fufilling as what an elitist chef would prepare. Price should be no object. If you are eating to consume, then it is. I never go to restaurants anymore.... They are boring.
Love your blog!

Heather Overstreet

omg i loveeeeeeeee it!!! I have been obsessed with your blog since i found it 2 hours ago lol Im a major foody myself and i swear we share a brain when it comes to the yums!!! My name is Heather im 28 from Vegas and my absolute fav food everrrr is Pho<3 just thought i would pop up to say....THANK YOU FOR GIVING ME THIS BLOG lol

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